Tag Archives: Best Realtor

Mountain Events: November 14th-15th

Saturday, November 14th 2015

Shopping Extravaganza: 9:00am Outlets at Silverthorne. Click Here for more information.

Bounce and Tumble: 9:30am Silverthorne Recreation Center. Click Here for more information.

Creative Writing Club: 10:30am South Branch Summit County Library. Click Here for more information.

Girls on the Run: 11:00am Summit County Middle School, Frisco. Click Here for more information.

“Blizzard of Aahhh’s!” Screening: 5:00pm & 8:00pm Warren Station Center of the Arts, Keystone. Click Here for more information.

8th Annual CAIC Benefit: 5:00pm Riverwalk Center, Breckenridge. Click Here for more information.

 

Sunday, November 15th 2015

Glass Fusing: 12:00pm Ready Paint Fire, Breckenridge. Click Here for more information.

Public Skate Session: 1:15pm Stephen C. West Ice Arena. Click Here for more information.

Nordic Ski Swap: All Day Breckenridge Nordic Center. Click Here for more information.

Summit Ski Exhibit: All Day Summit Ski Museum, Breckenridge. Click Here for more information.


 

Winter is Finally Here

Mountains Open
Arapahoe Basin
Breckenridge
Copper Mountain
Keystone
Loveland Ski Area

Opening Soon
Vail: November 20th
Beaver Creek: November 25th


 

Summit County Spas

Some of my favorite spas for either a quick treatment or a full day retreat.

Refresh Spa: Grand Timber Lodge, Breckenridge. (970) 547-3624
Sooth Spa: Grand Lodge on Peak 7. (970) 547-8701
Bodyworks Spa & Massage: Frisco, CO. (970) 668-5859
Corpus Sanus Spa: Dillon, CO. (970) 513-6550
Elan-Life Spa: Silverthorne, CO. (970) 368-6680

El Niño is Coming: What that means for Real Estate

Realtor.com discusses the effect El Niño may have on the market this winter, especially in the front range. Though sometimes harsh winters limit selling, “the Herald reported that there have been 23 El Niño winters since 1950; most of them we haven’t even noticed.”


 

Realtor.com What Will the Winter of El Nino Be Like for Colorado Real Estate? By Lisa Davis

A funny thing about El Niño and the hot Denver market: This winter, the weather pattern will bring much-needed snow in Colorado—but locals aren’t sure that’s good news.

More frequent and wilder storms are expected across the western U.S., inundating those parts with snow and rain. Now Coloradans are wondering if a whole lotta snow will mean a whole lotta slow in the real estate market. That’s what the Durango Herald looked into this weekend.

“Heavy snowfall may be great for the Durango area’s ski industry,” the paper reported, “but it could put a chill on the area’s real estate market.”

None of the industry professionals the Herald interviewed were prepared to offer a definitive vision—there are as many potential outcomes as there are Eskimo words for snow. (As a reminder: 50.)

But while snow is good for the ski areas in theory, “the winter can have a dampening effect on land sales if the property is deeply covered with snow, and the same can be true for residences with acreage,” Don Ricedorff of The Wells Group told the Herald.

The story continued, “The Federal Reserve Board’s Beige Book, an anecdotal summary of economic conditions reported by the Federal Reserve districts, frequently reports accounts of low inventory and construction delays during extreme winter weather and temperatures.” Sellers don’t feel like packing up and moving in the dead of winter, it added.

Low inventory has been a continuing problem for parts of Colorado, but not just because of snow. Rather, it’s because of demand. Denver is the No. 1 hottest market in our October rankings, and in recent months its sales have increased more sharply than those in any other city.

Is Denver’s real estate market hot enough to melt all that El Niño snow? Heck, it may not even need to be. After all that fretting, the Herald reported that there have been 23 El Niño winters since 1950; most of them we haven’t even noticed. Just in case, though, take some tips from us. You can find them in our story on how to Niño-proof your home.

By: Lisa Davis

For original article: What Will the Winter of El Niño Be Like for Colorado Real Estate?

7 Home Buying and Selling Tips From the Property Brothers

The Property Brothers is one of my favorite HGTV shows. My husband and I were able to collect a ton of inspiration for our first home from their episodes. Shannon Petrie with HGTV outlines The Property Brothers 7 Home Buying and Selling Tips that might help you with your home purchase. 


 

Photo: Caitlin Croneberg; HGTV’s The Property Brothers

By: Shannon Petrie

Jonathan says: “In order to pump these homes out as fast as the builders want to, some of them cut corners like not waiting long enough for concrete to cure properly or hiring untrained labor forces. I’m not saying new construction is bad; you just want to find a builder who has a quality product – it’s going to last a lot longer.”

Do your homework when buying a brand-new home.

Jonathan says: “In order to pump these homes out as fast as the builders want to, some of them cut corners like not waiting long enough for concrete to cure properly or hiring untrained labor forces. I’m not saying new construction is bad; you just want to find a builder who has a quality product – it’s going to last a lot longer.”

Know the hidden costs of buying a home.

Drew says: “Over and above the actual purchase price of the home, you may have to dish out some money for land transfer fees, mortgage costs, home insurance, legal costs and title insurance. Ask your real estate agent for a complete list of all the estimated closing costs so the only surprises you get will be the good ones.

Never skip the home inspection.

Jonathan says: “I can’t stress enough how important it is to get a home inspection, whether you’re getting a fixer-upper or or something brand new. The seller most likely will cover any costs of a problem that pops up. If you’re putting an offer in, make it subject to a home inspection, so that way nobody else is going to swoop in and take the property out from under you, and it gives you enough time to make sure the house is actually a good investment.”

Get to know the neighborhood before buying.

Drew says: “Nothing compares to actually walking the neighborhood prior to buying in the community. Pounding the pavement will give you a clear image as to how noisy it is, the density of traffic and what your neighbors are like. Getting to know the locals will give you that insider scoop as to whether or not this is the kind of neighborhood you want to raise your family in.”

Don’t fall for love at first sight.

Drew says: “I always recommend touring at least 10 houses before you put an offer in on one. The first few houses may seduce you aesthetically, but may not really have what you need. When you walk through a home, have a checklist in hand; write down the pros, write down the cons and rate that house from 1 to 10. At the end of a long house hunting day, all the houses are going to blend together, and it’s that checklist that’s going to be the saving grace and will get you your dream home.”

Put safety first when remodeling a home.

Jonathan says: “We make it look like a lot of fun on TV, but things can go seriously wrong if you just blast through a wall with wild ambition. Plan first: For safety, you want to have glasses, masks and gloves. Go down to the circuit breaker and make sure you shut off any electrical in the wall. Finally, just stop frequently and investigate inside the wall where you’ve opened it up to make sure there are no other surprises.”

Simple staging tactics go a long way toward making a quick sale.

Drew says: “Depersonalize: Pack up the family photos and artifacts. Declutter: Clean off the countertops and pack away the knickknacks. As a final touch, make your house sparkle: Wash the windows and clean away the old cobwebs. Simple steps make a huge difference and can lead to a sold sign on your house.”

For the full article and videos from the show that support their 7 tips check out HGTV’s 7 Home Buying and Selling Tips From the Property Brothres.

http://www.zillow.com/blog/go-bigger-or-go-to-a-new-home-185877/

“Go Bigger or Go to a New Home?”

The Zillow Blog discusses the all to common question homeowners eventually get to: To Upgrade or To Renovate? 


 

Zillow Blog: Go Bigger or Go to a New Home?
TIPS & ADVICE / STORY / BY BRENDON DESIMONE ON 2 NOV 2015

Go Bigger or Go to a New Home?

You’ve got two options when it comes to a home you’ve outgrown: add on or trade up. Which is right for you?

Many homeowners today face a serious housing dilemma. They love their home, its location, and even their neighbors. But they’ve outgrown the space. Do they trade up to a bigger or better house, thus entering a busy real estate market, or stay put and renovate?

Most homeowners have never sold and bought at the same time, nor have they lived through a renovation. Both experiences are incredibly stressful, and many people don’t know what to expect. Here are some tips for making an informed decision.

Know what you’re getting into

It’s helpful to know that it is cheaper to stay in your current home and renovate than it is to sell your home and buy a bigger one. And renovating isn’t as big a deal as one may think.

If you go into it with an open mind and full awareness, it’s not so bad. However, some people are just not cut out for living with dust, disruption, and a little bit of chaos.

Living through a renovation means a constant stress is hanging over you. If you can’t take that in your life, don’t fool yourself.

Check your finances

The most important thing you need to do is understand your home financial situation. Do you have equity in your home? If so, how much, and would you need those funds to either renovate or purchase the new home?

Is a home equity line of credit available to you? Using that money provides the mortgage tax benefit for the interest, which makes an equity line a no-brainer.

What would you need to spend on a new home in your desired location? Just like when you first got pre-approved to purchase the original home, you need to get pre-approved and run the numbers. You may find that the house you can get isn’t much bigger than where you are, or that you have to change areas to get more space.

Define your renovation requirements

What exactly is it that you need? An extra bedroom or bath, more family or community space, a larger kitchen or a master bath? Put it all out there and prioritize.

Can these changes be made within the envelope of your current home, or would you have to expand outside your walls? Renovating inside might mean that you need to leave the home for some time, while an expansion might allow you to stay in the home during the renovation.

Research zoning and building codes

Learn how building and zoning laws will affect your plan to renovate. Find out if expansion is even a possibility.

Many people think that finishing the basement is as easy as putting up some walls and carpet and moving the TV downstairs. But did you know that you likely need two forms of egress or certain height and insulation to make a finished basement meet code? A few hours of an architect’s time can help get you the information you need.

If you want to add on, make sure that your lot is big enough. Town zoning laws only allow a certain percentage of the lot to be covered. If you’re at your max, you’re out of luck.

Set-back laws might mean that you can only expand in the front or on one side of the property. You may find out immediately that what you want to do simply isn’t possible, and the decision is made for you.

Don’t over-improve for the neighborhood

You need a master bathroom and family room or some extra square footage, but will the neighborhood support it? You don’t want to be the biggest or best house on the block when you go to sell. A big master suite or designer kitchen may be just what you want, but will future buyers pay for it?

Do some research, talk to a real estate agent and attend open houses in your neighborhood. If you don’t know, ask. But do not embark on a large renovation project if you can’t get your money back when it’s time to sell.

Get ready for a different kind of stress if you move

Purchasing a new home and selling your existing one simultaneously means instant stress that is intense and compacted in a short period. The stress may come in the form of carrying two mortgages, getting a bridge loan or waiting for your home to get an offer.

Remember how you felt when you purchased your first home? Now double or even triple that.

Expect the expenses

When you sell your home, you need to pay the real estate commission and transfer tax on the sale, and you may be taxed on any gain. When you get a mortgage for the new home, expect more loan and title fees upfront.

While many closing costs and transfer fees are tax deductible, you don’t realize anything from these expenses. The $10,000 in fees might be better spent toward a new bathroom. Before you decide to explore this path, gather some information about costs.

Deciding whether to trade up or sell and buy is incredibly personal. The most obvious thing to do is to check your finances, and see what is out there on the purchase market. Learn what’s happening and understand how you would fare. And even if it’s intimidating, seriously consider renovating. It is incredibly rewarding to be able to make your home even more custom to you.

For original article: please visit the Zillow Blog.