Tag Archives: Buying a Home

Review Highlight

Zillow Reivew

I am so lucky to love my job. One of my favorite parts is seeing how happy my clients can be with their purchase or their sale. Thank you to my client from 1043 Straight Creek Dr for this wonderful Zillow Review.

“Anne helped me buy and sell my first home. She made both processes very smooth and enjoyable. Her knowledge on the local market is what impressed me most. When I talked with her about listing my condo she gave me a few ideas to help maximize its’ selling potential. When it came to listing it I had offers before it hit the market and after her open house I again had multiple offers and ultimately sold above listing price. I can’t thank Anne enough for getting me such a great purchase price and even better selling price!” – 1043 Straight Creek Dr #O-101 Dillon, CO

If you or anyone you know is looking to move on or move up please contact me. I look forward to helping you!

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Homebuyer Education Class

Summit Combined Housing Authority

Mark your calendar for the Summit Combined Housing Authority’s Homebuyer Education Class on Tuesday, April 11th at 8:30am.

Tuesday, April 11th 8:30a – 1:00p 
Buffalo Mountain Room, County Commons
0037 Peak One Drive, Frisco, CO 80443

If you have any questions about buying your first home please feel free to contact me with your questions!NEW AS LOGO EMAILS

Sold Listing!

1796 Four Seasons Blvd. SOLD!

This beautiful single family home located in Leadville, CO was successfully sold! We had multiple offers and sold the home over the list price at $352,000 to a very satisfied buyer who can’t wait to make this his home!

If you’re looking to list your home please contact me for a free home evaluation.

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Interest Rates

Did you know Interest Rates Are Low Right Now? 

interest rates

Interest rates have been one of the biggest incentives to purchase a home over the last few years.  With interest rates at historic lows, you are able to borrow more money that you would otherwise.  Your interest makes up a huge portion of your monthly mortgage payment.

For example, if you have a gross monthly income of $4000 with virtually no debt, you could afford a payment of around $1100 per month.  That figure comes from the standard that many banks use that says your monthly housing costs should not exceed 28% of your monthly income.  If your interest rate is 4%, the portion of that $1100 that goes towards your principal is greater.

When the interest rates rise to 5%, that decreases the portion of the payment that actually goes towards your principal.  What that translates to is the at 4%, you might be able to qualify for a mortgage around $195,000 where as at 5%, you might only qualify for $178,000.  The most important thing to remember about interest rates is that they don’t change your monthly payment, but rather how that payment is divided up and ultimately what you are about to qualify for.

-Anne Skinner

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Success Story: 250 Ski Hill Rd.

Success Story: 250 Ski Hill Rd. 

Preparation and research can make your home buying experience very smooth. It is important to me to always do as much as I can before we even go to showings, so that your time is best spent in spaces you have interest in, or that I feel will meet your needs.

I was working with some wonderful Buyers and we were able to find them a wonderful home after only one showing. Working collaboratively in advance I was able to narrow their search down to some viable choices right off the bat saving them time in their real estate search.

Let me help you find your perfect mountain escape!

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Open House TODAY, Saturday July 16th

Open House Today, Saturday July 16th!

TODAY (Saturday July 16th) 1p – 4p

310 S 8th Avenue #2
Frisco, CO 80443

Come stop by this incredible townhouse just a block off of Main Street:

$794,500
3 Bedroom
1 Bathroom
2 3/4 Baths

Property Information

Come see me, Saturday July 15th 1p – 4p! See you there,

Anne Skinner

How Much Does a Remodel Cost, and How Long Does It Take?

How Much Does a Remodel Cost, and How Long Does It Take?

The 2016 Houzz & Home survey asked 120,000 Houzzers about their renovation projects. Here’s what they said

RENTING YOUR VACATION HOME YOURSELF? AVOID THESE FIRST-TIMER PITFALLS

Summit Mountain Rentals (a property management company in Summit County) has some great advice for first-time second homeowners who are looking to rent their property. 


RENTING YOUR VACATION HOME YOURSELF? AVOID THESE FIRST-TIMER PITFALLS

By

Mark Waldman

If you’re renting your vacation home for the first time, it’s easy to fall victim to what we call “first-timer pitfalls.” Renting your vacation home is a business. Unfortunately, many forget this and treat renting their home too casually or forget to consider the consequences. Running a business, even a small one like renting your property, takes time, effort and thoughtfulness.

Here are the top things to never forget:

Pay your taxes
In the beginning of the vacation rental market, governments were not too worried about a single homeowner paying sales tax. But with the advent of VRBO, AirBnB and other online channels of sale, vacation rentals by owners is big business — with big revenue. Local tax entities no longer look kindly upon a “casual” attitude toward paying taxes. The last couple of years, city, county and state governments have offered amnesty to homeowners for back taxes as long as they start paying current taxes. However, these types of programs are going away.

If you are renting your property, you owe sales tax — and not paying sales tax is a crime. If you have not been paying sales tax, start now. Remember, it does not affect your rental’s price. Everyone expects to pay sales tax on top of the price you list; you just need to tell your guests and charge them for it. There is no reason to risk criminal action, so pay your taxes.

Need help? Check out this great article on vacation rental taxes.

Get professional pictures of your rental
Yes, this costs money. But the difference in revenue, guest satisfaction and just plain pride in your home calls for professional pictures. And, unless you sell photography for money, you are not a professional photographer. The number one way to distinguish yourself from other properties in the sales process is to have great pictures. Homeaway/VRBO is now building algorithms to determine if you have good pictures; if so, you get a higher spot in their listings. This will become standard in the market. Not only do good pictures generate better income; it makes for happier guests. The number one way to make a guest happy is to meet or exceed their expectations. So take lots of great pictures and let your guest know exactly what they are getting. You will make them happier, generate better income and reviews, and just make your life easier.

Upgrade your vacation home
If you walk into your vacation home and say “Wow, I really like being here,” so will your guests. Think of it this way: going cheap gets cheap — and going nicer gets nicer. If you furnish and treat your home like a “rental,” then your guest will do the same. If you furnish and treat your home like a beautiful home, then your guests will do the same. Nicer homes have much less wear and tear because guests love them and come back. I always advise my owners to make their home something they love to come to. It always works — guests know the second they come into a home whether the owner cares about their property. And, it will generate more money for you. The number one way to increase price and sell more nights is creating repeat guests. People come back to places they like. Making your home spectacular not only makes you feel good when you visit, it makes your guests feel good and makes you more money through higher rates and higher occupancy.

Need help? Check out these great articles on updating vacation-home kitchens and bathrooms.

A bad bed is just a bad bed
Have you slept or at least tried to take a nap on all the beds in your vacation home? If you haven’t, do it. One bad review about mattresses can make you lose a lot of guests. People don’t call and ask if you replaced a bad mattress they read about in a review; they just don’t come. If you get a complaint, go try to sleep on the bed. If your mattresses are 10 years old … they are 10 years old! Replace them. The primary function of a vacation home is to sleep. Often your guests will not even eat in the home, but they all sleep in the home. If you don’t give them a good night’s sleep, nothing else matters.

Need help? Check out this great articles on updating vacation-home bedding.

Have local resources ready
Now that you have found your renters, collected their money and checked them in — what happens next? Why, Murphy’s Law, of course: “Anything that can go wrong, will go wrong.” The TV won’t work, the heat goes out, the air conditioning goes out, the fire alarm goes off, the water doesn’t come out of the master shower … and so on. Almost no one realizes how often things go wrong in their own home … we just take care of it. But in your vacation rental — for which someone is paying good money — you now have to take care of the same issues for someone else. And, you’re a 1000 miles away.

It is imperative that you not only have names and numbers of good local vendors (plumbers, electricians, etc.) but that you have interviewed them. You need to know if the plumber will come out on a Sunday night at 10 p.m. (You do know that toilets only overflow on a weekend night, right?) You need to know that your audio video resource will be able to fix the TV on Super Bowl weekend (again, this always happens!). You need to know that electrician will go out and fix the power at 1 a.m. so the house does not freeze. There is nothing worse than having a guest yelling at you over the phone because their 2-year-old child has been sleeping in a freezing cold or overheated room for four hours. Be prepared … and know your resources.

Pricing is important
Don’t be fooled: Having every date sold in July 2016 by the end of August 2015 the previous year is not “great.” It means your pricing is WAY TOO LOW. Not only have you lost out lots of revenue, you have probably rented to the cheapest and least respectful people. The same is true for not having July 4 booked by June 15. In this case, your pricing is probably WAY TOO HIGH.

So … pricing is very important. You need to sell your property, but you don’t want to give it away. The trick is research and paying attention. Do a quick search of the vacation homes that are similar to yours. How are they priced? Now do you want sell your home before them (price yours slightly lower) or after them (price yours slightly higher). Then pay attention. if your home is selling too fast, raise the price. If it is selling slowly, lower the price.

Renting a vacation home is a job
It takes time. Don’t fool yourself. If you want to do it yourself, make sure you have the time to do things right. What I’ve discussed here is just a small part of what it takes to rent your vacation home yourself. If you take the time and do it right, you can make good money. But if you don’t have the time or don’t like doing it, no amount of money made will be worth the aggravation.

So, try it! You’ll know quickly if you like it. If you don’t like doing it, get a good property management company do it for you. Either way, USE YOUR HOME AND ENJOY IT. I have found that owners who visit their vacation home often have the happiest guests. If you are happy with your vacation home, then others will be happy too.

If you have any questions about renting your vacation property yourself, call me! I’m happy to talk with you and help you get started. Here’s my number:

Mark Waldman, Owner, Summit Mountain Rentals, 970-423-7382

Or, shoot me an email. You can also post any questions (or tips) on vacation rentals in the “Comments” section below.

New Single Family Home Listing!

Featured Property

6 Things You Should Never Let Movers Touch

6 Things You Should Never Let Movers Touch

By
Angela Colley

Halfdark/iStock

So after years of DIY/friend-assisted moves, you’ve finally decided to hire movers. As a fellow lazy convenience-minded person, I salute you. The heavy-lifting, traffic-negotiating, stair-climbing nightmare parts of moving day are out of your hands.

But before you kick back and start daydreaming of sleeping in on the big day, I also have some bad news: There are some things you always want to move yourself.

Even if you’ve hired pros, you’re still probably going to be renting a truck or tucking a few things away in your car. Yes, I know—that completely bursts your nothing-to-do bubble. But you’ll want these things for their safe arrival.

1. Your pets

Obviously, you’re not going to pack Rover in a box with some air holes, but you still need to do some prep work.

Moving is stressful for pets. Add the potential danger of their busting free in the chaos of moving, and it could be a bad situation. Save yourself a headache later and pack them a travel bag now.

If you’re moving across town, plan to take water and food bowls, food, treats, an extra leash, a favorite toy, and a crate with you in the car.

If you’re moving out of state, your movers probably won’t transport your pets, but you can hire a pet-moving service.

2. Houseplants

Houseplants are a bigger moving-day hassle than you might realize.

First, your mover might not be able to take some of your plants, because local and interstate laws may forbid it.

“Before doing anything with houseplants, it’s good to check with your state’s Department of Natural Resources or the U.S. Department of Agriculture to make sure there aren’t any restrictions for moving that particular type of plant,” says Jonathan Deesing, a community specialist with imove.

If the plants are allowed on the truck, you’ll still have to worry about everything arriving safely.

“Only pack up plants that are hardy and can survive a bumpy ride,” he says. Fragile plants (we’re looking at you, orchids) may not survive in the back of the truck. So put them in an open box in your car with some padding to keep the pots from tipping over.

3. Firearms

If you’re packing, the movers probably aren’t.

Whether you’ve got an antique revolver just for display or a powerful hunting rifle, this one is a big no-no for obvious reasons.

“It’s best to move your guns on your own for safety reasons, and many moving services will not even consider moving guns for you anyway,” Deesing says.

If you’re moving your arsenal, don’t forget your safety lessons. Pack bullets and guns separately, and keep everything clearly marked and out of the reach of children.

And remember the rules and regulations.

“Make sure you have all the paperwork in order before moving guns across state lines,” Deesing says.

4. Your record collection and other valuables

Whether it’s the complete history of the blues on 350 vinyl records, or a collection of antique snow globes, “if you can’t stand the thought of losing it, don’t put it on a moving truck,” Deesing says.

Your moving company isn’t going to toss any of your stuff around (we hope), but accidents do happen. It’s one thing when it happens to that bookshelf you bought at Target, but another when it happens to your great-grandmother’s antique lamp set. If in doubt, bring it with you.

5. Personal paperwork

Pack your Social Security card, birth certificate, auto title, and any other important paperwork in a waterproof case, and haul that with you. Inevitably, something gets misplaced in a move. And it’s not helpful to find your passport six months after you had to scramble to get a last-minute replacement for your vacation to Spain.

“Of all your belongings, these can often be the most difficult to recover if lost or damaged in transit,” Deesing says.

6. Climate-sensitive artwork

If you’re moving across town or within the same state, your artwork can probably be safely packed and stowed away on the moving truck. If you’re moving several states away and the temperature might change drastically on the trip, you might want to bring those originals with you in your climate-controlled car.

“If you have artwork in a truck and move from the Northeast to the Deep South, it could irreversibly damage certain paints and materials,” Deesing says.

———

For everything else, follow this rule: When in doubt, overcompensate.

“Communication is key with any part of the move, and this is no exception,” Deesing says. “Don’t take risks, either—clearly label your fragile items and feel free to supervise movers as they load items onto the truck.”